Naïveté? Or Exploitation?

If there was one thing I learned from my Peace Corps experience it was that people everywhere know a lot more than the lucky few in the worldwide elites believe they do—and that the idea of helping them is really, at its heart, an idea of helping that elite. We lucky ones, generally from industrialized … Continue reading Naïveté? Or Exploitation?

Why the Business Model Doesn’t Work for Education

It's simple, really. In our adoration for free enterprise that has been built into cult-like status over the past generation, we have forgotten the prime rule of business: failure is the norm.Let me say it again: failure, in business, is far more common than success. When we opened Shakespeare's Sister in 1994, the cliche was … Continue reading Why the Business Model Doesn’t Work for Education

"And All the Pundits Are Below Average"

In January, Thomas Friedman wrote:In the past, workers with average skills, doing an average job, could earn an average lifestyle. But, today, average is officially over. Being average just won’t earn you what it used to. It can’t when so many more employers have so much more access to so much more above average cheap … Continue reading "And All the Pundits Are Below Average"

Biometric “Hysteria”?

Diane Ravitch may be adamant and forceful... but hysterical? In a post today, she refers to another, one by Gary Houchens, a professor of "Educational, Leadership, & Research" at Western Kentucky University. His is entitled "Biometric hysteria: the anti-research mentality of the educational status quo." In a postscript Ravitch writes: I do not like to … Continue reading Biometric “Hysteria”?

The School of Teaching Without Teaching, Part II

This morning, before leaving for school, I responded to Thomas Friedman's piece in today's New York Times. I wrote quickly. Though today is "reading day" before final exams, I am responsible for a good deal of advisement and needed to get to the college so that I can talk to students face-to-face. As a teacher, … Continue reading The School of Teaching Without Teaching, Part II