Boycott Elsevier? Yes, But the Real Solution Lies Elsewhere

One does not become an academic to get rich. Even the most successful, those who end up owning a patent or writing a best-selling book, earn paltry amounts when set against any real standard of wealth. The reasons one does become an academic are myriad, from passion for teaching and/or research to desire for a … Continue reading Boycott Elsevier? Yes, But the Real Solution Lies Elsewhere

The Myth of Peer Review–And Helping Make Academic Gatekeeping Work in Digital Environments

Peer review has long been something of an unexamined black box. Something is peer reviewed? We accept that it has been checked and re-checked, examined and tested. Just look at the way it is used in the popular media--"peer review" is accepted as reflecting a process of rigorous vetting. In situations of promotion, re-appointment and … Continue reading The Myth of Peer Review–And Helping Make Academic Gatekeeping Work in Digital Environments

Lessons for Academics: What Journalists Know About Gatekeeping (Part 2)

Journalists today know how to use the internet for research so well that they don’t even know they know it. That is, digital tools now come so naturally to hand, and have been tailored so expertly to the needs of the specific individuals and projects, that the journalists don’t even think about them—they just use … Continue reading Lessons for Academics: What Journalists Know About Gatekeeping (Part 2)

Lessons for Academics: What Journalists Know About Gatekeeping (Part 1)

In preparing my talk on peer review for the MLA conference in Seattle last week, I forgot that few of my fellow academics have much familiarity with ‘gatekeeping,’ certainly not to the extent that journalists have, especially after the upheavals of the past decade. Though the situations are different (journalists working with a responsibility to … Continue reading Lessons for Academics: What Journalists Know About Gatekeeping (Part 1)